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Hate Crime Reporting

What is a Hate Incident or a Hate Crime?

A hate incident is any incident which is perceived by the victim, or any other person, to be motivated by prejudice against someone's

  • Race
  • Religion
  • Disability
  • Sexual orientation
  • Trans identity

A hate incident becomes a hate crime when the incident meets the threshold to become a criminal offence.

What behaviour might constitute a hate incident or hate crime?

What behaviour might constitute a hate incident or hate crime?

The following types of behaviour could constitute a hate incident or hate crime when combined with a perceived prejudice related to someone's racial heritage, religion, disability, sexual orientation or trans identity.

  • Verbal abuse, name-calling and offensive 'jokes'
  • Harassment
  • Bullying
  • Threats and intimidation
  • Physical violence (or the threat of)
  • Sexual violence (or the threat of)
  • Online abuse
  • Property damage
  • Graffiti
  • Hate mail/messages

Incidents can be a one-off, or part of an ongoing patterm of behaviour.

Why report hate incidents or hate crime?

When you report hate crime, you become part of the movement to stop it. No matter how small or trivial you think the incident might be, it is important to the whole community that it is acknowledged and reported.

Every report builds up a picture of what is really going on in the local area, showing patterns of behaviour against a certain group or by particular individuals. The more that local agencies know, the better they can educate, inform and protect everyone in the area.

"It's not serious enough to report."

You might not know if the incident is a criminal offence, or you may think it’s not serious enough to be reported, but even if your report doesn’t lead to a prosecution, there are other things that can be done to help you deal with the incident. This might include extra home security or CCTV coverage, advice, and support.

Some hate crimes start as smaller incidents and escalate into more serious and frequent attacks, so every report matters - even if you think it’s not that significant.

When you report, you might even be helping to prevent these incidents from happening to someone else.

"These things happen all the time."

You don’t have to just accept that these things happen, they shouldn’t, and with your report we can help stop it happening again.

Just because you haven't reported similar incidents in the past, doesn't mean you can't choose to make a report now.

"I don't trust the police"

We recognise that many individuals and communities have had negative experiences with the police, and may not wish to engage with them. There are alternatives to reporting directly to the police, including via the SU Advice Centre and Wellbeing Support Services who are independent third party hate crime reporting centres.

"Nothing will happen about it"

Whilst it is not always possible to identify and prosecute the perpetrators, hate crime reports are vital to preventing future hate incidents and hate crime. Every report builds up a picture of what is really going on in the local area, showing patterns of behaviour against a certain group or by particular individuals. The more that local agencies know, the better they can educate, inform and protect everyone in the area.

On a quarterly basis local agencies review hate crime/incident data, and identify any patterns and trends. They then plan, design and deliver area-specific and community-specific actions in response to identified patterns and trends.

How can a hate incident or hate crime be reported?

You can report a hate incident or hate crime you've experienced or witnessed, and access support, by:

What information is needed for a report?

The report (usually via a form) can include as much or as little information as the person making the report wishes to share. However, if minimal information is given there may be limitations on what investigation can take place.

Information commonly prompted includes:

  • Category of hate crime e.g. sex, race, religion, disability, or sexual orientation.
  • The desired response to the report, such as
    • Wanting to discuss the options further prior to any action taken
    • No further action at this stage
    • Multi-agency response to the incident
  • Details of the person making the report (name, address, contact details, demographic data)
  • Details of the victim if not the person making the report (if known/able to share)
  • Details of the perpetrator (if known)
  • Details of any witnesses
  • Details of the incident, including a description of what happened

What support is available for victims of hate incidents and hate crime?

Wellbeing Support Services provide wellbeing advice and support for students, including one-to-one appointments, email therapy, and therapy groups.

Victim Support provide free, confidential emotional and practical support to people who have been affected by crime, including hate crime.

The Mix provide a helpline for under-25s, available 3pm-midnight 7 days a week.

Galop is an LGBT+ anti-ciolence charity, who operate a hate crime support service.

Switchboard LGBT+ Helpline offer confidential support and information. All their volunteers self-define as LGBT+.

Tell MAMA is an independent and confidential support service for those who face anti-Muslim heatred and prejudice.

Scope, the disability equality charity, operate a helpline that provides practical information and emotional support.

Samaritans operate a helpline which is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.